PINE PRUNING

PINE PRUNING

Question: PINE PRUNING


HELLO
I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF IN THE PRINTS OF PINE OFTEN VERY DELICATE IN GENERAL IF YOU TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE MOON (GROWING OR CALING) YOU CAN IMPROVE THE SUCCESS?
THANKS

Answer: PINE PRUNING


Dear Alberto,
as you may have noticed also in the street trees of your city, in the last few years pruning is carried out differently than in the past; if at one time the pruning interventions were always drastic and of great entity, today we tend to follow more the natural development of the trees; in fact, in nature trees, even if very large, show that they do not need pruning and still maintain a balanced crown, with a harmonious development, which prevents the tree from having an incorrectly positioned center of gravity, and therefore being at the mercy of wind and weather. Until a few years ago, it was believed that only with pruning could one maintain a dense and dense crown and with a clean and elegant design; in reality, the pruning of tall trees often has a negative effect on the foliage of the trees, which then tend to respond strongly to the chisel interventions, releasing more vigorously, thus making it unnecessary to remove the branches for their containment; or rather, the more a tall tree is pruned, the more it must be pruned in the following years. As for conifers, this is a little different, as these trees have a different behavior than the other tall trees, and when we go to cut off a branch in depth, this will not be replaced by the tree, which will tend instead to further swell one of the branches that are already present; therefore usually today, except in extreme cases, in which the tree has been placed in a garden of dimensions not suitable to contain it, we tend not to prune the conifers; above all, the top of the conifer is not pruned, which otherwise will assume a bizarre bearing, with the branches just below the apical cut that will try to grow upwards, to replace the existing top. If some prunings are necessary, they are carried out at the end of winter, or after the conifer has bloomed, but avoiding reaching the central part of the foliage, where the wood has no foliage. Following the lunar phases, the prunings are carried out in the waning moon phase, because it is believed that in this period of the month there is less sap in the plants in circulation, and therefore the pruning should be less harmful to the whole plant and the cut should heal more quickly. The lunar phases in gardening have been followed for millennia, but this method has its proselytes, and also its detractors; there is no 100% certain scientific evidence that following the moon phases is fundamental in agriculture, but only empirical evidence.